School Information on Hawaii School Guide 2

August 4, 2009 by admin 

Hawaii School Guide offers detailed information on each school in the State. Our main goal is to help parents and students in the decision making process of choosing a school. From the school’s basic information to test scores, the Hawaii School Guide has gathered every bit of information and made it easy for parents and students to; find, compare and contact schools they are interested in.

Below is a set of the information which parents and students can basically get online. To see how Hawaii School guide has organized this, please visit Noelani Elementary School.

 

Noelani Elementary School Description

Noelani Elementary School is nestled in Manoa Valley, a very old and established community. The school has grown from a one building school in 1962 to its present design with over six buildings. Noelani School’s enrollment of 536 students has become more diverse socially, economically, ethnically, and culturally. To address Noelani’s increasingly diverse student population, the school has moved to a standards based system.

Through a multitude of resources such as Noelani’s PTA, grants, and community/business partnerships, Noelani is committed to providing all students with innovative, authentic, student centered, and student driven learning opportunities.Through project based learning, our students are given latitude to learn and express themselves in different modes, raising their enthusiasm for school and motivating them to become active learners and higher achievers.

In recent years, Noelani students composed original scores, expressed their understanding of history through weaving projects, demonstrated their learning on stage, and web published their discoveries. Technology is embraced as a seamless tool to support, enhance, and demonstrate student learning. Noelani has in place the Comprehensive Student Support System (CSSS) to ensure that all students have the opportunity to receive appropriate services and/or is able to participate in programs which address their needs.

1. School Information

  • General Infrormation
    Address 2655 Woodlawn Drive
    City Honolulu
    Island Oahu
    Zip 96822
    Grade From K
    Grade To Gr. 6
    Contact Person Dr. Rochelle Mahoe
    Phone No. 808 988-1858
    Fax No. 808 988-1855
    Website http://www.noelani.k12.hi.us
    No. of Teachers 32
    No. of Students 456
    District Name Honolulu
    Complex Area Name Kaimuki-McKinley-Roosevelt
    Complex Name Roosevelt
    School Code 140
    School Name Short Noelani El
    Military Impacted No

 

2. Statistics

  • Summary of Progress – Noelani Elementary School’s Summary of Progress Report shows how teaching, learning and assessments are being based and aligned to Hawaii State Standards and Benchmarks. It summarizes progress made in accomplishing school improvement goals.
    • 2007-2008

    Noelani Elementary School’s faculty and staff developed and shared the school’s academic and strategic plans with the School Community Council (SCC) for recommendations and affirmation, as it became a working document for school improvement. As a faculty-initiated document, and through focused articulation and accountability for all activities and outcomes, three goals were purposefully infused into the daily curriculum.

    Goal 1 was to improve student achievement through standards-based education. To this end, efforts were made to provide teachers with opportunities to participate in professional development workshops to extend learning of content pedagogy with sharing of best practices through professional learning communities (PLC). While developing a school-wide reading curriculum framework was the main focus, mathematics and science curriculums were also examined for they will be concurrently worked on during the next two years. Monthly horizontal and vertical articulation provided time to align and update curriculum maps and continued work on developing school-wide agreements for response formats and scoring. These best practices in instruction and assessment strategies, along with technology integration provided the basis for student learning. General Learner Outcomes (GLO) were also targeted to provide students with opportunities for goal setting and self-improvement.

    Goal 2 focused on providing comprehensive support for all students. It is our belief to recognize the individuality of each child and provide for a variety of learning styles. Everyone collaborated to provide students with timely and appropriate supports. School-wide implementation of the Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS) was evident in the behavioral expectations and demonstrations by students in all school settings. All students practiced the three B’s – Be Safe, Be Respectful, and Be Responsible. Quarterly recognition of Noelani Notables, students from every class who consistently displayed these characteristics, provided inspiration for all students.

    Goal 3 centered on actions leading to school improvement. The PLCs served to cultivate teachers as leaders who then addressed ways to improve the school by investigating curriculum (through the developing frameworks), assessment (both formative and summative), and reporting practices. Noelani teachers piloted Pinnacle, a web-based grade book in collaboration with Dr. Robert Marzano to validate student proficiency of standards. The use of technology, both web-based and using software provided on school computers, augmented student learning.

    This shared process of developing the academic and strategic plans enabled stakeholders to understand what it is that students should know and do to improve their performance and productivity. Underlying all is what the school’s vision, created by the school community, is about – “Noelani is a launching pad to the global community, a learning community that nurtures responsible world citizens.”

    • 2006-2007

      1. Inclusiveness: Involvement and collaboration of school community members: Faculty and staff provided input for the development of the school’s academic, financial, and strategic plans. Additionally, plans were shared with the School Community Council for recommendations and affirmation. All stakeholders were involved with monitoring and reporting for the quarterly progress reports.

      2. Purposefulness: Clarification of the school’s purpose/mission & the school wide learner outcome.
      The General Learner Outcomes [GLOs] are a part of the Standards Based Report Card. Faculty and staff continue to embed the GLOs with standards-based education, classroom assessments, and positive behavioral expectations.

      3. Student-Focused Efforts: SID process focuses on the quality of the work of students & the school. The impact of the school’s plan, decisions, & actions on student achievement of standards are addressed. Data about students & student achievement are gathered & analyzed.
      Focused standards-based curriculum, effective teaching best practices, and quality assessments guide the school’s plans, decisions, and actions with regard to student achievement.

      • HCPS III aligned curriculum maps implemented in all classrooms
      • Writing response in-service conducted in Nov., Jan., Feb., March, and May. Teachers continue to examine student work to identify exemplars and anchors.
      • Monthly horizontal as well as various vertical articulation opportunities afforded for professional dialogue with minutes documented on Lotus Notes.
      • School Assessment Learning Teams (SALT) continued to share curriculum and assessment strategies as evidenced in student work produced in all classrooms
      • School-wide initiative on scientific inquiry using (RIP) implemented.

      4. Action Orientation: Assessment of the entire school’s program & it’s impact on student learning in relation to the General Learner Outcomes (GLOs) & Hawaii State Assessment.
      The school’s programs focused on student achievement of HCPS III standards, the attainment of the six GLOs, and the improvement of HSA test results. To this end, professional learning communities (PLC) with representation from all grade and faculty groups worked to support all school-wide action plans and initiatives.

      5. Accountability: Implementation of an assessment & accountability system for evaluating school progress toward the GLOs.
      An assessment and accountability system for evaluating the school’s progress towards the GLOs is a shared responsibility by all shareholders of Noelani Elementary School. Posting of minutes/agenda of articulation, PLC, and other focus groups allowed for easy access by all. Continued professional development & curricular in-service provided to assist attainment of GLOs.

      6. Strong Leadership and Support System: Support of school leadership in facilitating the SID process.
      Sustaining the professional learning communities with supportive and shared leadership empowered all to build school capacity to meet the goals of the academic and strategic plan.

      • Use of student data to inform instruction using a variety of strategies
      • Commitment by faculty to shared values and vision
      • Resources aligned with school goals for improvement
      • Collective responsibility by all for student learning
    • 2005-2006

    1. Inclusiveness: Involvement and collaboration of school community members:
    The faculty and administration are primarily responsible for the implementation of the SID Action and Strategic Plans. Teachers are provided opportunities for input, review, revision, and monitoring of the plans through committee and faculty meetings as well as through electronic posting and sharing of files.

    2. Purposefulness: Clarification of the school’s purpose/mission and the school wide learner outcome.
    The General Learner Outcomes [GLOs] are a part of the Standards Based Report Card. Faculty and staff continue to embed the GLOs with standards-based education, classroom assessments, and positive behavioral expectations.

    3. Student-Focused Efforts: SID process focuses on the quality of the work of students andthe school. The impact of the school’s plan, decisions, & actions on student achievement of standards are addressed. Data about students & student achievement are gathered and analyzed.
    The Hawaii State Assessment [HSA] test results have impacted the focus of the school’s plans, decisions, and actions. The three-year HSA data of grades 3 & 5 continues to reflect a larger percentage proficiency in reading (Gr. 3 – 78.8%, Gr. 5 – 82.6%) with a smaller proficiency percentage in math (Gr. 3 – 58.9%, Gr. 5 – 60.9%). Grades 4 & 6 initial tests also reflect this trend: Gr. 4 Reading – 81%; Math – 54%; Gr. 6 Reading – 88%, Math – 73% Improving achievement levels continues to be a priority addressed through HCPS aligned standards-based instruction and formative assessments. The Safe School Information System [SSIS] recorded a total of 74 discipline referrals for the period of 8/05-5/06. Problems were in the area of physical contact (42), Disrespect/Noncompliance (15), and Property Misuse (8).

    4. Action Orientation: Assessment of the entire school’s program & it’s impact on student learning in relation to the General Learner Outcomes (GLOs) & Hawaii State Assessment.
    The school-wide action plan focuses on student achievement of the standards, the attainment of the GLOs, and the improvement of the HSA test results. The on going evolution of professional learning communities [PLC] with shareholders from all grades and faculty groups work to support student learning through articulation opportunities. Collaborative engagement of professional learning communities that assist the school include: Professionalism/Capacity [SID], Grade Level Chairs, Curricular Committees, School Assessment Learning Team [SALT], HSTA, SCC, PTA, PBS cadre, Safety, Student Council, Craft Fair, Talent Show, Songfest, and Mayfair.

    5. Accountability: Implementation of an assessment & accountability system for evaluating school progress toward the GLOs.
    Noelani continues to seek a more efficient and comprehensive system for collecting and analyzing useful data that will assist in the improvement of student learning and achievement. We have made progress as a school through the implementation of research-based strategies as well as best practices shared by the SALT initiative through the development and use of curriculum/benchmark maps addressing HSCPS III. Professional development will continue to focus on curriculum instruction and assessment through professional learning communities.

    6. Strong Leadership and Support System: Support of school leadership in facilitating the SID process.
    The SID process allows for involvement by all shareholders. Sustaining the professional learning communities with supportive and shared leadership empowers all to build capacity in the school to meet the goals of the academic and strategic plan.

    • 2004-2005

    1. Inclusiveness (Rating: 3) Involvement and collaboration of school community members.
    The faculty & the administration are primarily responsible for the implementation of the SID Action Plan. Noelani has provided its teachers with time to attend monthly committee meetings to provide additional opportunities for staff input in the review and monitoring of the SID Narrative and Action plan. The SID plan is shared electronically (email and shared file) for all faculty& staff members to review& revise.

    2. Purposefulness (Rating: 3) Clarification of the school’s purpose/mission & the school wide learner outcome.
    The General Learner Outcomes (GLOs) were introduced into the Student Progress Report. The staff is continually embedding the GLOs with standards-based education & multiple classroom assessments.

    3. Student-Focused Efforts (Rating: 4) SID process focuses on the quality of the work of students & the school. The impact of the school’s plan, decisions, & actions on student achievement of standards are addressed. Data about students & student achievement are gathered and analyzed.
    The Hawaii State Assessment (HSA) test results have impacted the focus of the school’s plan, decisions, & actions. Generally, the HSA test data over a 3-year period indicate that there are an increasingly large percentage of Noelani students who are proficient in reading and mathematics; however, a smaller percentage of students were proficient in math. Improving achievement levels in mathematics has been a priority this year. School-wide efforts focused on the need to increase the percentages in the proficient range in both reading and mathematics. The Safe School Information System (SSIS) recorded a total of 125 discipline referrals for the period of 8/04-6/05. Problems were in the area of disrespect/noncompliance (42 referrals), physical contact (37 referrals), & other violation of school rules (21 referrals).

    4. Action Orientation (Rating: 4) Assessment of the entire school’s program & it’s impact on student learning in relation to the General Learner Outcomes (GLOs)&Hawaii State Assessment.
    The school-wide action plan focuses on student achievement of the standards, the attainment of the GLOs, and the improvement of the HSA test results. The SID process was revised to increase the level of communication among shareholders. More opportunities have been given to the faculty and staff to increase their role and responsibility in facilitating the SID process. The curriculum and school committees have been restructured and redefined to allow faculty and staff ample opportunities for input and to facilitate the SID process of the school. We have added the Professionalism/Capacity (SID Process), School-Wide Reform (Assessment), and Quality Student Support to the list of curriculum committees. Additionally, we have a full representation of grade levels serving on the following school teams/ committees: School Assessment Learning Teams (SALT) and Grade Level Chairs, HSTA, SCBM, PTA, PBS Cadre, Safety, Student Council Advisor, Craft Fair, Talent Show, Mayfair, and Songfest.

    5. Accountability (Rating: 3) Implementation of an assessment & accountability system for evaluating school progress toward the GLOs.
    Noelani continues to seek a more efficient and comprehensive system for collecting and analyzing useful data that will assist in the improvement of student learning and achievement. We have made progress as a school to work towards developing curriculum and instruction that is standards-based. Professional development and collaboration will continue to focus on curriculum mapping, reading and writing, classroom assessments, and the establishment of professional learning communities.

    6. Strong Leadership and Support System (Rating: 3) Support of school leadership in facilitating the SID process.
    The SID process should allow for more involvement by all shareholders. The school is moving towards the development of a professional learning community that will naturally empower teachers to be leaders. School administration must focus on the efforts to build capacity in the school while providing a clear understanding of school needs and the alignment of those needs to the academic and financial plan.

    • 2003-2004

    1. Inclusive: A collaborative process, which involved all stakeholders, was used. The SID Narrative and Action Plan were primarily based on the school’s Blue Ribbon application process in which all stakeholders were involved. The final outcome was shared with the school’s faculty and staff, SCBM Council, and PTA for input, review, and approval prior to submission in December 2001. The SID Narrative and Action plan has been shared electronically (email and shared file) for all staff members to review and add/delete. We have continued to employ technology to get input from various shareholders and post these results on a shared folder. Our progress is further shared through our PTA Board and SCBM Council.

    2. Purposefulness: School wide learner outcomes were identified (adoption of the State’s General Learner’s Outcomes) and clearly described with performance indicators/descriptors. Staff is working towards embedding the GLO’s in their teaching and learning. The GLO’s are incorporated in the NCLB consortium grant that Noelani successfully applied for with Washington Middle School and Roosevelt High School.

    3. Student-Focused Efforts: The school has reviewed the statewide HAP test to analyze Noelani student achievement of reading and math standards. Test results indicate that a sizable number of Noelani students are proficient in reading standards, however, a smaller number of students were proficient in the math standards. The data provided to the schools has impacted the focus of the school’s plan, decisions, and actions. All aspects of Noelani schooling are supportive of the school wide learner outcomes and HCPs. We continue to review and monitor all aspects of the school’s system to ensure that support for student learning is maximized. The NCLB grant “Journey to Excellence” hired a Math Consultant, Dr. Anthony Picard to work with the staff over time (5 sessions) addressing student proficiency to Math Standards. The focus of each session: 1st Geometry, 2nd Measurement Standards, 3rd Data Analysis and Probability, 4th Algebra, 5th Number and Operation Standard.

    4. Action Orientation: The schools plan focuses on student achievement of the standards encompassing the requirements of various programs and initiatives. (Provide support for students needing extra help in math by creating a pullout program with a resource position. The support program works with students in grades 3-6 furthest from proficiency. The NCLB consortiums grant, “Journey to Excellence addresses teacher quality, technology integration, and innovative reform programs to work towards student achievement of standards. The school successfully applied for an Artist in the School grant to address student diversity. This initiative fosters student achievement of standards by providing all students with the opportunity to learn and express their learning in a variety of ways through the arts. The school successfully applied for nine Good Idea Grants funded by Hawaii Public School Foundation. The grants will provide essential resources to support classroom-initiated projects. Noelani School was the recipient of an prestigious art award and received $3,000.00. The money will be used to support art -based projects in the classroom. Cadre of teachers will be participating in a variety of professional development/training opportunities offered by the Complex Area Resource Teams (Science and Math)

    5. Accountability: All stakeholders were given the opportunity to participate in developing the plan. Formative and summative evaluation data is being used to determine appropriate follow-up actions. (Assessment, evaluation, reflection, discussion/charting, minutes of professional development days/waiver days.)

    6. Strong Leadership and Support System- Leadership come in different forms and have been successful in facilitating the SID process. (Writing cadre, Math cadre, Assessment cadre I & II, Grade Level Chairs, PBS Cadre, SID peer review team, Curriculum Committees).

    • 2002-2003

    Vision and Mission Statement: At the very heart of Noelani’s vision and mission statement is a strong commitment to educational excellence for all students. Our vision, created by the school community, “Noelani, our launching pad to theglobal community,” steadfastly illustrates our purpose and mission of “Noelani is a learning community that nurtures responsible world citizens.” With clear expectations attuned to our vision, we have initiated and carried through several reforms: moving from traditional education to a standards-based system; from low technology to technology as a seamless tool for productivity, communication, research, problem-solving and decision-making; from teaching one way to all students to providing multiple approaches and views for diverse learners to learn in a variety of modes and rates, and from conservative schooling to a collaborative enterprise to ensure intellectual, social, moral, and physical growth for all students to succeed in a global community.

    Belief Statements: The Noelani School community, through shared decision making, collaborative efforts, and unity of purpose, adopted the following beliefs: 1. Recognize the individuality of each child and provide a variety of choices and opportunities for every child to experience different learning styles. 2. Nurture a community of learners, in which positive role models are an integral part, helping each other through cooperation and collaboration. 3. Provide positive reinforcement, allow for mistakes, accept and respect differences, and foster collaboration. 4. Develop a learner-centered curriculum that focuses on the connecting of prior knowledge to new knowledge in integrated subject areas, respecting individual learning styles. 5. Foster the teaching-learning process which recognizes that learning means connecting to something practical and meaningful; construct knowledge through hands-on exploration of the environment; promote discovery and invention; and encourage risk-taking.

    General Learner Outcomes: Noelani School has adopted the State of Hawaii four General Learner Outcomes (GLOs) which we believe are embedded in every subject area of the new Hawaii Content and Performance Standards.

    Standards Implementation Design Summary: In response to Noelani’s Standards Implementation Action Plan, the peer review wrote (in italic/bold) Noelani has: Effective programs and plans for improvement: Noelani teachers applied for grants to develop standards -based projects. The grants helped to move Noelani’s educational system to one of vitality, a thinking and meaning centered curriculum based on current research and practices, and aligned with Hawaii Content and Performance Standards. This resulted in the school receiving: Seven Good Idea Grants, an Artist in the school grant and a Technology Literacy Challenge Grant.

    Developed an Action Plan that is standards-driven based on faculty survey results: The data collected was used to plan the four professional development days for the staff and faculty.

    A strong sense of commitment toward improvement through its staff development plans: Noelani’s staff is committed to all students’ achievement of standards. This was indicative when all teachers opted to be an active participant of “Kids Saving our Future” grant and agreed to request for two “Waiver Days” to work on the SID Action Plan for 2002-2003. An Action connects GLOs to the rationale and to benchmarks; a tie-in to student performance outcomes is needed: The school is aware that Noelani’s SID Action Plan is lacking student data. Noelani will be developing a range of mechanisms (surveys, school-wide test etc.) to collect a broader range of student data to drive the school’s action plan.

    Evidence of resourcefulness in involving parents and community in their projects: We have employed a wide range of strategies to ensure that parent and community involvement continues to be integral to the school’s established support system. Well developed involvement activities and events include: Kindergarten Coffee Hour, T-shirt sales, Open House, Grandparents’ Luncheon, Parent/Teacher Conference, Book Fair, Craft Fair, Songfest, Keiki ID, Camp Erdman, Turtle Bay, Big Island Trip, Jogathon, May fair, Talent Show, and Promotion Day.

    A consistent and strong sense of leadership and high expectation for students and teachers: Teacher leadership teams were developed to lead inquiry study sessions and workshops in their respective areas to address standards and impact student learning.

    • 2001-2002

    Vision and Mission Statement: At the very heart of Noelani’s vision and mission statement is a strong commitment to educational excellence for all students. Our vision, created by the school community, “Noelani, our launching pad to theglobal community,” steadfastly illustrates our purpose and mission of “Noelani is a learning community that nurtures responsible world citizens.” With clear expectations attuned to our vision, we have initiated and carried through several reforms: moving from traditional education to a standards-based system; from low technology to technology as a seamless tool for productivity, communication, research, problem-solving and decision-making; from teaching one way to all students to providing multiple approaches and views for diverse learners to learn in a variety of modes and rates, and from conservative schooling to a collaborative enterprise to ensure intellectual, social, moral, and physical growth for all students to succeed in a global community.

    Belief Statements: The Noelani School community, through shared decision making, collaborative efforts, and unity of purpose, adopted the following beliefs: 1. Recognize the individuality of each child and provide a variety of choices and opportunities for every child to experience different learning styles. 2. Nurture a community of learners, in which positive role models are an integral part, helping each other through cooperation and collaboration. 3. Provide positive reinforcement, allow for mistakes, accept and respect differences, and foster collaboration. 4. Develop a learner-centered curriculum that focuses on the connecting of prior knowledge to new knowledge in integrated subject areas, respecting individual learning styles. 5. Foster the teaching-learning process which recognizes that learning means connecting to something practical and meaningful; construct knowledge through hands-on exploration of the environment; promote discovery and invention; and encourage risk-taking.

    General Learner Outcomes: Noelani School has adopted the State of Hawaii four General Learner Outcomes (GLOs) which we believe are embedded in every subject area of the new Hawaii Content and Performance Standards. Standards Implementation Design Summary: In response to Noelani’s Standards Implementation Action Plan, the peer review wrote (in italic/bold) Noelani has: Effective programs and plans for improvement: Noelani teachers applied for grants to develop standards -based projects. The grants helped to move Noelani’s educational system to one of vitality, a thinking and meaning centered curriculum based on current research and practices, and aligned with Hawaii Content and Performance Standards. This resulted in the school receiving: Seven Good Idea Grants, an Artist in the school grant and a Technology Literacy Challenge Grant.

    Developed an Action Plan that is standards-driven based on faculty survey results: The data collected was used to plan the four professional development days for the staff and faculty.

    A strong sense of commitment toward improvement through its staff development plans: Noelani’s staff is committed to all students’ achievement of standards. This was indicative when all teachers opted to be an active participant of “Kids Saving our Future” grant and agreed to request for two “Waiver Days” to work on the SID Action Plan for 2002-2003. An Action connects GLOs to the rationale and to benchmarks; a tie-in to student performance outcomes is needed: The school is aware that Noelani’s SID Action Plan is lacking student data. Noelani will be developing a range of mechanisms (surveys, school-wide test etc.) to collect a broader range of student data to drive the school’s action plan.

    Evidence of resourcefulness in involving parents and community in their projects: We have employed a wide range of strategies to ensure that parent and community involvement continues to be integral to the school’s established support system. Well developed involvement activities and events include: Kindergarten Coffee Hour, T-shirt sales, Open House, Grandparents’ Luncheon, Parent/Teacher Conference, Book Fair, Craft Fair, Songfest, Keiki ID, Camp Erdman, Turtle Bay, Big Island Trip, Jogathon, May fair, Talent Show, and Promotion Day.

    A consistent and strong sense of leadership and high expectation for students and teachers: Teacher leadership teams were developed to lead inquiry study sessions and workshops in their respective areas to address standards and impact

    • 2000-2001

    At the very heart of Noelani’s vision and mission statement is a strong commitment to educational excellence for all students. Our vision, created by the school community, “Noelani is our launching pad to the global community” steadfastly illustrates our purpose and mission of being “a learning community that nurtures responsible world citizens.” With clear expectations attuned to our vision, we have initiated and carried through several reforms. Moving from traditional education to a standards-based system; from low technology to technology as a seamless tool for productivity, communication, research, problem-solving and decision-making; from teaching one way to all to providing multiple approaches and views for diverse learners to learn in a variety of modes and rates; and from conservative schooling to a collaborative enterprise to ensure intellectual social, moral, and physical growth for all students to succeed in a global community. We are reworking our programs to meet the needs of our changing population and to address Local and National educational goals.

    We believe that if our students are continually challenged in an exciting and relevant learning environment, student performance will reach higher levels of achievement. It is with this belief that we have worked long and hard to provide all students with access to high expectations, challenging curricula and effective teaching. We have made much progress in accomplishing this ambitious task by moving towards a standards-based system. We have adopted the four General Learner Outcomes (GLOs), which we believe are embedded in every subject area of the new Hawaii Content and Performance Standards.

    The major goals for the School Year 2000-01 were many and inspite of the lengthy HSTA strike, we were able to accomplish much. Noelani teachers applied for grants to support classroom innovations, and school-wide initiatives. This resulted in the school receiving ten (l0) Public Schools of Hawaii Foundation grants ($16,500), one (1) Artist in the school grant ($10,000), one (1) Title VI grant ($40,000), one (1) Technology Literacy consortium Grant ($100,000), and one (1) Arts in Education Curriculum Development Initiative Grant ($2,300). The grants helped move Noelani’s educational system to one of vitality, a thinking and meaning centered curriculum, educational foundation based on current research and practices, and aligned with the National Standards, Hawaii Content and Performance Standards, and SCANS competencies. Partnerships with organizations helped to maximum our resources and support student learning included: Manoa Marketplace, University of Hawaii Outreach Program, Kiewit Pacific, Grace Pacific Paving Company, Moanalua Gardens Foundation, Manoa Valley Theater, State of Hawaii Attorney General’s Office, Lyon Arboretum, Hawaii Shotokan Karate, Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops, and the Lions International Clubs. Logistically feasible, we have extended our learning arena to the UH Campus whereby our students operated real robots and had hands-on bridge construction experiences at the College of Engineering, had an art experience in the UH Art Gallery while absorbing the knowledge and expertise of a bonafide curator…to our teachers dancing across the curriculum in collaboration with a performing arts professor and professional dancers…to the opportunity of over 300 Noelani students attending a dance performance at the Kennedy Theater for free. We have employed a wide range of strategies to ensure that parent and community involvement continues to be integral to the school’s established support system. Well-developed involvement activities and events included: Kindergarten Coffee Hour, T-shirt sales, Open House, Grandparents’ Luncheon, Geography Week, Parent/Teacher Conference, Art Show, Book Fair, Craft Fair, Songest, Keiki ID, Camp Erdman. Turtle Bay Sleepover, Big Island Trip, Jogathon, Mayfair, Talent Show, Promotion Day.

    Noelani’s achievement of being honored as a National Blue Ribbon School for 2000-2001 is clearly indicative of the school’s success and effectiveness in teaching and learning. Another noteworthy accomplishment is Noelani’s principal Clayton Fujie being selected as the National Distinguished Principal of the Year for 2000- 2001. Other accomplishments for 2000-2001 include; Noelani teachers receiving the following awards: Superintendent Aizawa Literacy Award (Beverly Miyake), Tom Adams Public Schools of Hawaii Foundation Award (Sharlene Arita), Milken Award & Honolulu District Teacher of the Year Award (Linda Morikone).

 

  • Student Profile – Noelani Elementary School’s Student Profile describes the school’s Fall Enrollment, Number and Percent of students enrolled for the entire school year, Number and Percent of students receiving free or reduced-cost lunch, Number and Percent of students in Special Education programs, Number and Percent of students with Limited English Proficiency and Percent of Kindergarteners who attended Preschool.

 

    • 2007-2008
    Fall Enrollment 459
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 424
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 47
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 21
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 50
    • 2006-2007
    Fall Enrollment 518
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 476
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 55
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 29
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 33
    • 2005-2006
    Fall Enrollment 526
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 508
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 61
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 26
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 30
    • 2004-2005
    Fall Enrollment 529
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 513
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 42
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 24
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 41
    • 2003-2004
    Fall Enrollment 543
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 518
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 39
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 30
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 20
    • 2002-2003
    Fall Enrollment 534
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 473
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 73
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 26
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 43
    • 2001-2002
    Fall Enrollment 552
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 529
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 44
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 24
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 50
    • 2000-2001
    Fall Enrollment 536
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 509
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 38
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 25
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 16
    • 1999-2000
    Fall Enrollment 520
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 446
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 56
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 29
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 17
    • 1998-1999
    Fall Enrollment 488
    No. of Students Enrolled for the Entire School Year 471
    No. of Students Receiving Free or Reduced-Cost Lunch 34
    No. of Students in Special Education Programs 23
    No. of Students with Limited English Proficiency 59
  • Ethnicity Statistics – Noelani Elementary School’s Ethnicity report focuses on giving the number and percent of students enrolled by race. It describes the population of the 13 common races as well as other foreign races usually enrolled in a school.
    • 2007-2008
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 5
    Black 6
    Chinese 69
    Filipino 24
    Hawaiian 3
    Part-Hawaiian 31
    Japanese 138
    Korean 36
    Portuguese  
    Hispanic 4
    Samoan 4
    White 65
    Indo-Chinese 5
    Other 61
    • 2006-2007
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 2
    Black 7
    Chinese 69
    Filipino 15
    Hawaiian 3
    Part-Hawaiian 29
    Japanese 185
    Korean 31
    Portuguese  
    Hispanic 5
    Samoan 3
    White 83
    Indo-Chinese 1
    Other 82
    • 2005-2006
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 2
    Black 10
    Chinese 69
    Filipino 12
    Hawaiian 3
    Part-Hawaiian 29
    Japanese 186
    Korean 28
    Portuguese 3
    Hispanic 6
    Samoan 6
    White 81
    Indo-Chinese  
    Other 103
    • 2004-2005
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 2
    Black 9
    Chinese 75
    Filipino 12
    Hawaiian 6
    Part-Hawaiian 29
    Japanese 193
    Korean 32
    Portuguese  
    Hispanic 7
    Samoan 7
    White 72
    Indo-Chinese  
    Other 102
    • 2003-2004
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 1
    Black 7
    Chinese 70
    Filipino 13
    Hawaiian 6
    Part-Hawaiian 30
    Japanese 199
    Korean 20
    Portuguese  
    Hispanic 7
    Samoan 9
    White 82
    Indo-Chinese  
    Other 113
    • 2002-2003
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American  
    Black 8
    Chinese 58
    Filipino 14
    Hawaiian 9
    Part-Hawaiian 35
    Japanese 191
    Korean 24
    Portuguese 2
    Hispanic 7
    Samoan 4
    White 80
    Indo-Chinese  
    Other 113
    • 2001-2002
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 1
    Black 5
    Chinese 60
    Filipino 15
    Hawaiian 8
    Part-Hawaiian 33
    Japanese 198
    Korean 18
    Portuguese 3
    Hispanic 5
    Samoan 5
    White 77
    Indo-Chinese  
    Other 127
    • 2000-2001
    Ethnic Race Number
    Native American 1
    Black 4
    Chinese 62
    Filipino 22
    Hawaiian 5
    Part-Hawaiian 32
    Japanese 198
    Korean 10
    Portuguese 4
    Hispanic 5
    Samoan 4
    White 78
    Indo-Chinese  
    Other 111
    • Ethnicity by Race
    • Native American

    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 2 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 2 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 2 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 1 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 1 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 1 Native American students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Black

    Noelani Elementary School had 6 Black students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 7 Black students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 10 Black students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 9 Black students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 7 Black students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 8 Black students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Black students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 4 Black students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Chinese

    Noelani Elementary School had 69 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 69 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 69 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 75 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 70 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 58 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 60 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 62 Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Filipino

    Noelani Elementary School had 24 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 15 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 12 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 12 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 13 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 14 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 15 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 22 Filipino students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Hawaiian

    Noelani Elementary School had 3 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 3 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 3 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 6 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 6 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 9 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 8 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Part Hawaiian

    Noelani Elementary School had 31 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 29 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 29 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 29 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 30 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 35 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 33 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 32 Part-Hawaiian students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Japanese

    Noelani Elementary School had 138 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 185 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 186 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 193 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 199 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 191 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 198 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 198 Japanese students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Korean

    Noelani Elementary School had 36 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 31 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 28 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 32 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 20 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 24 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 18 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 10 Korean students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Portuguese

    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 3 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 2 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 3 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 4 Portuguese students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Hispanic

    Noelani Elementary School had 4 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 6 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 7 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 7 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 7 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Hispanic students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Samoan

    Noelani Elementary School had 4 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 3 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 6 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 7 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 9 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 4 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 4 Samoan students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • White

    Noelani Elementary School had 65 White students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 83 White students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 81 White students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 72 White students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 82 White students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 80 White students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 77 White students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 78 White students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Indo-Chinese

    Noelani Elementary School had 5 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 1 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 0 Indo-Chinese students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

    • Other

    Noelani Elementary School had 61 Other students in Hawaii school year 2007-2008
    Noelani Elementary School had 82 Other students in Hawaii school year 2006-2007
    Noelani Elementary School had 103 Other students in Hawaii school year 2005-2006
    Noelani Elementary School had 102 Other students in Hawaii school year 2004-2005
    Noelani Elementary School had 113 Other students in Hawaii school year 2003-2004
    Noelani Elementary School had 113 Other students in Hawaii school year 2002-2003
    Noelani Elementary School had 127 Other students in Hawaii school year 2001-2002
    Noelani Elementary School had 111 Other students in Hawaii school year 2000-2001

  • Enrollment Statistics – Noelani Elementary School’s Enrollment Statistics shows the no. of students enrolled in each year. Animated graph is used to easily determine how enrollment fluctuates every year.
    School Year
    Total Enrollment
    2001-2002
    528
    2003-2004
    513
    2004-2005
    505
    2005-2006
    500
    2006-2007
    489
    2007-2008
    438

 

  • Facilities -Noelani Elementary School’s facility report shows total number and shortage of classrooms if any. It also shows comprehensive condition of the facilities like building exterior, building interior, grounds, sanitation etc. through its Inspection rating.

School Facilities are considered inadequate if below 70%; marginal if between 70% and 99%; and in excess of state standard if above 100%. School population is placed into size categories and is used in formulas to determine State standards for space.

  • School Facilities
    • 2007-2008
    Available Classrooms 23
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2006-2007
    Available Classrooms 23
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2005-2006
    Available Classrooms 23
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2004-2005
    Available Classrooms 23
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2003-2004
    Available Classrooms  
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2002-2003
    Available Classrooms 23
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2001-2002
    Available Classrooms 22
    No. of Classrooms Short  
    • 2000-2001
    Available Classrooms 22
    No. of Classrooms Short  
  • School Inspection Rating
    • 2007-2008
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    3
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    2
    Equipment/Furnishing
    2
    Health/Safety
    3
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    15
    • 2006-2007
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    3
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    2
    Equipment/Furnishing
    2
    Health/Safety
    3
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    15
    • 2005-2006
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    3
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    3
    Equipment/Furnishing
    3
    Health/Safety
    3
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    17
    • 2004-2005
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    2
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    3
    Equipment/Furnishing
    3
    Health/Safety
    3
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    16
    • 2003-2004
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    2
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    3
    Equipment/Furnishing
    3
    Health/Safety
    2
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    15
    • 2002-2003
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    3
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    3
    Equipment/Furnishing
    3
    Health/Safety
    3
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    17
    • 2001-2002
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    2
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    2
    Equipment/Furnishing
    2
    Health/Safety
    2
    Sanitation
    2
    Total
    12
    • 2000-2001
    Score
    1
    2
    3
    Grounds
    3
    Building Exterior
    2
    Building Interior
    3
    Equipment/Furnishing
    3
    Health/Safety
    3
    Sanitation
    3
    Total
    17

    *For each Category: 1 = Unacceptable; 2 = Satisfactory; 3 = Very Good

  • Adequacy of School’s Space Compared with State Standards
    • 2007-2008
    Classrooms
    95%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    177%
    Library
    75%
    Administration
    94%
    • 2006-2007
    Classrooms
    91%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    156%
    Library
    61%
    Administration
    94%
    • 2005-2006
    Classrooms
    80%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    150%
    Library
    61%
    Administration
    94%
    • 2004-2005
    Classrooms
    89%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    150%
    Library
    61%
    Administration
    94%
    • 2003-2004
    Classrooms
    0%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    0%
    Library
    0%
    Administration
    0%
    • 2002-2003
    Classrooms
    43%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    150%
    Library
    61%
    Administration
    94%
    • 2001-2002
    Classrooms
    79%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    139%
    Library
    61%
    Administration
    94%
    • 2000-2001
    Classrooms
    82%
    Cafeteria/Auditorium
    144%
    Library
    61%
    Administration
    94%
  • Attendance & Absences – Noelani Elementary School’s Attendance & Absences shows the average daily attendance and average daily absences compared to the State Standard.
  • 2007-2008
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.80%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.7
    9

    2006-2007

    School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.80%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.6
    9
  • 2005-2006
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.20%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    6.7
    9
  • 2004-2005
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.70%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.8
    9
  • 2003-2004
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.70%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.8
    9
  • 2002-2003
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.40%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    6.3
    9
  • 2001-2002
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.90%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.5
    9
  • 2000-2001
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.50%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.8
    9
  • 1999-2000
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    96.50%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    6.4
    9
  • 1998-1999
  • School
    State Standard
    Ave. Daily Attendance: % (higher is better)
    97.00%
    95%
    Ave. Daily Absences: in days (lower is better)
    5.5
    9
  • School Retention – Noelani Elementary School’s Retention is also included in this report where it shows the percent(%) of students retained in every school year.
    • 2007-2008
    Total No. of Students
    378
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
    • 2006-2007
    Total No. of Students
    452
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
    • 2005-2006
    Total No. of Students
    452
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
    • 2004-2005
    Total No. of Students
    465
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
    • 2003-2004
    Total No. of Students
    459
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
    • 2002-2003
    Total No. of Students
    470
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
    • 2001-2002
    Total No. of Students
    381
    Percent Retained (%)
    0%
  • Suspensions – Noelani Elementary School’s Suspension report shows the number of students being suspended. Offenses are categorized into "Class" depending on the nature of violation committed. Class – D, for light violation and Class – A for grave offense.
  • 2007-2008
Non-Suspended
457
Suspended
2
*These 2 students were responsible for these 2 suspensions
Class A
0
Class B
2
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • 2006-2007
Non-Suspended
518
Suspended
0
*These 0 students were responsible for these 0 suspensions
Class A
0
Class B
0
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • 2005-2006
Non-Suspended
526
Suspended
0
*These 0 students were responsible for these 0 suspensions
Class A
0
Class B
0
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • 2004-2005
Non-Suspended
528
Suspended
1
*These 1 students were responsible for these 1 suspensions
Class A
0
Class B
1
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • 2003-2004
Non-Suspended
540
Suspended
3
*These 3 students were responsible for these 6 suspensions
Class A
1
Class B
2
Class C
0
Class D
3
  • 2002-2003
Non-Suspended
528
Suspended
6
*These 6 students were responsible for these 9 suspensions
Class A
1
Class B
8
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • 2001-2002
Non-Suspended
552
Suspended
0
*These 0 students were responsible for these 0 suspensions
Class A
0
Class B
0
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • 2000-2001
Non-Suspended
535
Suspended
1
*These 1 students were responsible for these 1 suspensions
Class A
1
Class B
0
Class C
0
Class D
0
  • Certified Staff – Noelani Elementary School’s Certified Staff report includes Teaching Staff, Professional Teacher Credentials, Students per Teaching Staff and Administrative and Student Services Staff. It gives details on teacher headcount, teacher in regular and special instruction, no. of teachers serving the school for more than 5 years, no. of fully licensed teachers, librarians and counsellors.
  • 2007-2008
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 26.0
Regular Instruction, FTE 23.0
Special Instruction, FTE 3.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 0.0
Teacher Headcount 26.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 12.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 9.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 26.0
Provisional Credentials 0.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 19.0
Special Instruction 7.0
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 2.0
  • 2006-2007
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 29.0
Regular Instruction, FTE 25.0
Special Instruction, FTE 4.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 0.0
Teacher Headcount 29.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 12.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 8.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 26.0
Provisional Credentials 3.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 19.6
Special Instruction 7.3
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 2.0
  • 2005-2006
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 28.5
Regular Instruction, FTE 21.0
Special Instruction, FTE 3.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 4.5
Teacher Headcount 29.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 13.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 7.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 28.0
Provisional Credentials 1.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 19.6
Special Instruction 8.7
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 2.0
  • 2004-2005
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 27.5
Regular Instruction, FTE 21.5
Special Instruction, FTE 3.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 3.0
Teacher Headcount 29.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 15.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 5.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 26.0
Provisional Credentials 3.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 20.6
Special Instruction 8.0
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 2.0
  • 2003-2004
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 27.5
Regular Instruction, FTE 21.5
Special Instruction, FTE 3.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 3.0
Teacher Headcount 28.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 21.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 3.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 27.0
Provisional Credentials 1.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 20.9
Special Instruction 10.0
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 1.0
  • 2002-2003
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 27.0
Regular Instruction, FTE 20.0
Special Instruction, FTE 3.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 4.0
Teacher Headcount 27.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 18.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 4.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 27.0
Provisional Credentials 0.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 21.4
Special Instruction 6.7
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 2.0
Counsellors, FTE 1.0
  • 2001-2002
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 25.0
Regular Instruction, FTE 22.0
Special Instruction, FTE 1.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 2.0
Teacher Headcount 25.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 25.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 2.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 0.0
Provisional Credentials 0.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 22.0
Special Instruction 24.0
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 1.0
  • 2000-2001
Teaching Staff
Total Full Time Equivalent (FTE) 27.0
Regular Instruction, FTE 23.0
Special Instruction, FTE 2.0
Supplemental Instruction, FTE 2.0
Teacher Headcount 27.0
Teachers with 5 or more years at this school 17.0
Teachers with advanced degrees 2.0
Professional Teacher Credentials
Fully Licensed 0.0
Provisional Credentials 0.0
Emergency Credentials 0.0
Students per Teaching Staff
Regular Instruction 20.4
Special Instruction 12.5
Administrative and Student Services Staff
Administration, FTE*  
Librarians, FTE 1.0
Counsellors, FTE 1.0
  • Test Scores – Noelani Elementary School’s Test scores covers Hawaii Content and Performance Standards (HCPS) and SAT9/TerraNova. Scores are given based on the grade level and the no. of students tested in a given year.
  • Hawaii Content and Performance Standards (HCPS)
Reading (%)
Math (%)
Type
Year
Grade
School
State
School
State
HCPS
2008
5
86
57
82
44
HCPS
2008
4
84
61
69
49
HCPS
2008
3
91
62
81
53
HCPS
2007
6
85
55
72
39
HCPS
2007
5
93
60
84
40
HCPS
2007
4
81
54
70
48
HCPS
2007
3
86
62
64
49
HCPS
2006
6
68
48
62
28
HCPS
2006
5
70
44
51
24
HCPS
2006
4
87
58
65
33
HCPS
2006
3
78
50
61
30
HCPS
2005
5
86
56
59
25
HCPS
2005
3
78
52
53
28

 

  • TerraNova and Stanford Achievement Test 9 (SAT9)
Reading ( % )
Mathematics ( % )
Type
Year
Grade
School
State
School
State
TerraNova
2008
5
98
79
95
78
TerraNova
2008
4
93
77
89
76
TerraNova
2008
3
95
73
91
74
TerraNova
2007
6
90
78
97
73
TerraNova
2007
5
96
78
96
77
TerraNova
2007
4
91
77
89
77
TerraNova
2007
3
90
74
85
75
SAT9
2006
6
91
80
95
84
SAT9
2006
5
95
77
93
82
SAT9
2006
4
93
75
94
85
SAT9
2006
3
93
82
93
87
SAT9
2005
6
94
80
100
83
SAT9
2005
5
91
78
96
83
SAT9
2005
4
94
74
96
84
SAT9
2005
3
90
82
94
87

 

3. Downloads

  • Hawaii State School Readiness Assessment
    (HSSRA)

    The school, complex areas, and State reports provide information on kindergarten children’s readiness to succeed in school and on the schools’ readiness to support their learning.

    The assessment instruments were developed by the School Readiness Task Force, in partnership with the Department of Education, Kamehameha Schools and Good Beginnings Alliance.

    School results, especially those of Title I schools, will be useful for school improvement plans and for school transition plans for entering kindergartners.

    The results of the assessment are published in reports for the state, complexes, and schools. Reports include the following:

    • Summary of Schools’ Early Education Profile Offers background information on elementary schools and the school’s early childhood policies and practices.
    • Summary of Kindergarten Class Profile Shows the proportion of entering kindergarten children who consistently display key characteristics and skills considered important to successful early learning experiences.
    • Benchmark Shows how many kindergarten classes consistently display key skills and characteristics and how many schools have well established early childhood policies and procedures.

    HSSRA Downloads

    School Year
    2008-2009
    2007-2008
    2006-2007

 

  • No Child Left Behind (NCLB)

    The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 is a federal law requiring elementary and secondary schools to demonstrate proficiency and progress according to accountability standards set by the state and approved by the U.S. Department of Education.

    The law requires states to implement an accountability system and report on performance measures related to Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in math and reading, participation and proficiency, graduation/retention rates, as well as other educational indicators, such as teacher qualification.

    To meet reporting requirements set forth by the law, the DOE publishes comprehensive reports annually, reflecting performance at both the state and individual school level.

    NCLB Downloads

    School Year
    2007-2008
    2006-2007
    2005-2006
    2004-2005
    2003-2004
    2002-2003
    2001-2002

  • School Quality Survey (SQS)

    The School Quality Survey (SQS) is a DOE-administered survey that asks teachers, students, and parents for their opinions of school quality. Schools may find survey results useful when developing self-reports for accreditation and standards implementation.

    The SQS includes five forms: teacher, parent, and elementary, middle/intermediate, and high school students. Each of these five forms contains approximately 45 items.

    The SQS is administered to all DOE schools that request surveys.

    SQS Downloads

    School Year
    2008
    2007
    2005
    2003
    2001

  • School Status and Improvement Report (SSIR)

    One of several major accountability reports produced annually by the DOE, the School Status & Improvement Report (SSIR) addresses standard-based education reporting requirements in 302A-1004, Hawaii Revised Statutes.

    The DOE prepares an individual SSIR for each school. Each school report contains a description of the school and its setting, a summary of school improvement progress, available resources, and vital signs on school performance.

    All individual school reports contain the following:

    • School Setting – Describes the student population and the school community.
    • School Improvement – Summarizes progress made in accomplishing school improvement goals.
    • School Resources – Includes teacher credentials, staffing levels as well as the adequacy of school facilities.
    • Vital Signs – Includes School Quality Survey (SQS) results, student conduct, test results, dropouts, and graduation/retention rates.

    SSIR Downloads

    School Year
    2007-2008
    2006-2007
    2005-2006
    2004-2005
    2003-2004
    2002-2003
    2001-2002
    2000-2001

  • Trend Report: Educational and Fiscal Accountability
    (TREFA)

    The Trend Report: Educational and Fiscal Accountability provides three years of trend data on school, complex, and State performance at selected benchmark grade levels with performance indicators in areas relating to student achievement, safety and well being, and civic responsibility.

    These reports are designed to present trend data information to the public in a concise two-page format for each complex and school.

    TREFA Downloads

    School Year
    2007-2008
    2006-2007
    2005-2006
    2004-2005
    2003-2004

Comments

Feel free to leave a comment...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!